New friends and lots of dancing…

The great thing about life in Tegus is that you just never know what’s going to happen next – I mentioned in my last blog that you can be having a really bad day and then something random will happen and that bad day will suddenly be amazing. There is always something going on and the chance to be spontaneous. And this weekend was  no different…

It was the birthday of Lurvin at my project last week and on Wednesday our team from my project went for lunch to celebrate – we went for Chinese, which in Honduras means a big plate of rice with veg and different meats, rico! Although I do miss prawn crackers a lot! Anyway the meal came to around 400L which is about $20 – so I thought I would treat everyone as it’s just nothing. In my head I worked it out as around £15, but it actually came out as just £10 on my bank statement – so a meal for 6 people was just £10!! Amazing! It is Kelvin’s birthday tomorrow so looking forward to some more Chinese food for lunch then 😉

 That evening there was a jazz concert which Joel had told me about – he couldn’t go in the end but I went with Julia and another friend, Macarena and a friend of hers. I like jazz music but I would never usually go out to a concert to listen to it – but it’s Honduras and you’ve gotta make the most of it 😀 In the end it was a really great night and the music was amazing – we ended up getting soaked when we left though as the usual Honduran downpours appeared. We hid in a supermarket nearby until a friend of Macarena’s turned up to drive us somewhere for dinner (in Honduras you can randomly call a friend and they most likely will just come and pick you up, it’s so random but lovely!).

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For the weekend Joel and I had a ‘maybe’ plan to go to Yoro (a town in the north) to visit his family but we didn’t end up going. Hopefully we will in a couple of weeks 🙂 I hadn’t made any other plans as I thought I might be away so it could have been a really quiet weekend… but of course not, I live in Tegus!! 😀 Another of the new volunteers, Sophie, who lives in Sabanagrande was in Tegus for the weekend and also our ICYE coordinator was changing so we all met for lunch on Saturday. Me, Julia and Sophie then went to my house to watch a film on my host Dad’s huge TV. Then that evening all my family and Teddy went for an impromptu visit to the cinema to see The Heat (it’s hilarious!). We got home around 9 and me and Sophie had earlier decided to go out… but I was feeling super tired and just wanted to go to bed. But as Sophie doesn’t live in Tegus and really wanted to go out I persuaded myself to get in the party mood… and I thought I could sneak off home early… silly me! We ended up going out with a guy called Maury, a friend of Joel’s, and went to somewhere I hadn’t been in ages, called Angry Beaver, and met some Maury’s friends. Angry Beaver is normally really packed at the weekend but it was super quiet for some reason so we left around 1am to go get some beers and go to someones house. Me and Sophie were desperate to do some dancing and we definitely managed that – seriously, I love it! I learnt some new moves and one of the guys said I was better than him and I’m a true catracha now 😀 (a catracho or catracha is a name Hondurans give themselves 🙂 ) We had a great night and didn’t end up going home until 5.30 in the morning when it was already light outside, whoops!

The next day we dragged ourselves out of bed and headed to the centre with Julia to get some hangover food… we ended up going to Chili’s and a place nearby for some yummy crepes. I will post a picture when Julia puts them on Facebook, they were seriously delicious! We’ve also been planning a weekend away soon – I have been to most of the touristy places in Honduras now (and I’m saving Roatan until I have holiday time at Xmas) so I’m happy to go wherever the girls decide 🙂 I have two days off my project this week too as it’s a bank holiday for Honduras so I’m going to try find somewhere new to go and make the most of it…

I also managed to skype with some of my best friends from university this weekend when they all met up in Leamington, I was quite jealous of them all being together and having some banter but it was great  to skype for a bit 🙂 however sad I am to leave Honduras in January, the excitement to see so many people I miss will help to ease the pain! 😀 and my dogs of course, miss them so much!!!

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Until next time… saludos!!!

England vs. Honduras

So this is a post about the general day to day life that I experience in Tegucigalpa, it is usually too dangerous to take pictures of things so I’ve got most of these pictures from the internet. I looked for a while for a picture of the streets of the centre, where I work, but I couldn’t find any… most likely because it’s too dangerous to flash a camera about there! A funny little story too… I was waiting in the women’s toilets at Wendy’s the other day and out of one of the cubicles comes a little girl no more than 5 and see’s me and straight away says ‘hola gringa’. Not in a mean way or anything, this is just what Latin Americans call anyone who is white. Technically it is only for people from the US but I guess it’s hard to tell the difference here. Laura is convinced it is an offensive term but I take it as like us calling Honduran’s ‘latinos’. Maybe it just depends on the way it’s used… Anyway, here are a few differences between good old England and my new home, Honduras: 

 

1. The capital city: London vs. Tegucigalpa

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2. The roads: nice, shiny motorways vs. huge cracks and potholes

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3. Car accidents: Obviously car accidents aren’t much different but I drove past a 4 car crash yesterday two times, with about 2 hours in between, and there were no police or ambulances to be seen. In England we usually have someone there within minutes… 

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4. Police: Friendly bobbies vs. intimidating (and often pervy) Honduran police 

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5. Army/Military: In a war vs. on the streets

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6. Cars: Normal sized, modest cars vs. huge, oversized cars 

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7. Taxis: Famous black cabs vs. barely working taxis (they’re fun though!) 

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8. Buses: Nice, safe buses vs. dangerous old yellow school buses or speeding rapiditos 

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9. Weather: dreading rain and cold in England vs. hot and humid in Tegus 

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11. Newspapers: Celebrity obsessed vs. daily murders and deaths 

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12. Home security: CCTV (or usually just locked doors) vs. barbed wire and broken glass on the walls around all houses

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13. Local corner shop: A small shop with everything you could want vs. a ‘pulperia’ with bars to talk through and not much stuff

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14. Food: The good, old classics (my mum was mean and told me she was having Shepards pie the other day and now I can’t stop thinking about it…) vs. plato tipico consisting of frijoles, mantequilla, eggs, platano, tortillas and maybe some meat

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15. Fish and chips: Greasy vs. eyes staring at you 

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17. Money: One poin coin = 28 Lempira… in notes! (And yes, that is my own amazingly tanned hand in the picture!)

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18. And finally… the people: Crazy but lovely Brits vs. friendly and generous Hondurans

 

 

Of course some of these takes on things are quite generalised – like the tourism police that we met in the first weeks were very friendly (and not pervy) and there are lots more delicious examples of British food. But I hope you’ve enjoyed this little comparison of my old home and my current home!